CREEC co-founder Tim Fox to join ACLU National Board

We are very excited to announce that CREEC co-founder Tim Fox has been elected to the National Board of the American Civil Liberties Union!   Tim is thrilled at the opportunity to work with so many civil rights legends doing such important work.   (And I’m thrilled to tag along to New York and have the chance to both meet some of our favorite NYC advocates and visit my many NYC cousins while Tim attends board...

“The grate outdoors”

The Colorado Independent published an article today on our Anderson case.   It covers the hearing in the case on September 4, 2013, in which — among other things — Judge Brooke Jackson held that the exercise areas at Sterling Correction Facility do not provide outdoor exercise for purposes of the 8th Amendment. The judge had previously held that the exercise areas at the Colorado State Penitentiary did not provide required outdoor exercise and ordered the DOC to ensure that Troy Anderson has access for at least one hour, at least three times per week, to outdoor exercise in an area that is fully outside and that includes overhead access to the elements, e.g., to sunlight, rain, snow and wind. In response, rather than providing required outdoor exercise at CSP, the Department simply moved Mr. Anderson to Sterling.   The September 4 ruling indicates that that solution was inadequate.   Ultimately, the judge ordered the parties to talk and we are looking forward to working with the Department to ensure that Mr. Anderson gets both adequate outdoor exercise and adequate mental health...

Employee in hijab wins case against Abercrombie

Abercrombie & Fitch — the same folks who have been fighting to keep the steps at the entrance to their Hollister stores — just lost a case in San Francisco to an employee who was asked to remove her hijab.   From the press release of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR): U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled that Abercrombie & Fitch violated federal and state civil rights laws against workplace discrimination when it fired Hani Khan in 2010 for refusing to remove her hijab. The lawsuit, which was filed by CAIR-SFBA, LAS-ELC and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), sought to vindicate Khan’s rights against religious discrimination in the workplace. In her 25-page decision, Judge Gonzalez Rogers resoundingly rejected Abercrombie’s “undue burden” defense. The decision stated in part: “Abercrombie only offers unsubstantiated opinion testimony of its own employees to support its claim of undue hardship. Abercrombie failed to proffer any evidence from those four months showing a decline in sales in the Hillsdale store; customer complaints or confusion; or brand damage linked to Khan’s wearing of a hijab.” CAIR has posted a copy of the summary judgment decision. Congrats to CAIR’s San Francisco Bay Area office and the Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center (LAS-ELC) for a job well...
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