RTD enhancing use of wheelchair securement area and mobility access on light rail vehicles

The official press release from the RTD settlement.  A copy of the settlement is also available for review. Denver, CO, April 26, 2017 – The Regional Transportation District (RTD), Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC), and Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center (CREEC) are collaborating to ensure that passengers with mobility impairments requiring devices specifically to assist with ambulation, including manual and motorized wheelchairs, scooters, and walkers, are able to easily board and maneuver inside light rail vehicles. As a part of this effort, RTD will be altering the seating design of current and new light rail vehicles. The retrofit includes removing a set of seats next to the current wheelchair areas, which will open up the designated area for easier access. This will also provide additional standing room for passengers in light rail vehicles when not being used for mobility devices. Within the next five years, RTD will be retrofitting all existing light rail vehicles. In addition, all new vehicles will be substantially similar in design to the retrofitted vehicles. “We are committed to ensuring that our services are as accessible and safe as possible for all riders,” said RTD General Manager and CEO David Genova. “We continue to partner with organizations that represent the ADA community to look for ways that we can improve our facilities, vehicles and services.” RTD directs light rail operators not to discriminate against disabled riders and trains operators to ensure they are aware of their obligation not to discriminate. In addition, Plaintiffs and CCDC, and class members working with them, have agreed to notify RTD prior to filing future litigation against RTD concerning the...

CREEC mourns the passing of fair housing legend Tracey McCartney

The fair housing world lost a giant when Tracey McCartney passed yesterday.  To us, Tracey embodied the saying that there is no limit to what you can accomplish if you don’t care who gets the credit.  Tracey worked tirelessly but in many ways behind the scenes — known and beloved by the fair housing community but no fan of self-promotion.  She played a crucial role in connecting lawyers and advocates who work for fair housing around the country, patiently herding us like cats, and ensuring a platform in which we could share knowledge, ideas, mutual support, and gallows humor.  She was terrific at connecting people on an individual level, as well, and was hilarious and self-deprecating in person. Below is the press release issued by the Tennessee Fair Housing Council.  We miss you, Tracey, and will work to honor your memory. Long-time leader of the Tennessee Fair Housing Council, Tracey McCartney left this world following illness. McCartney leaves behind a loving spouse, Nancy Blomgren of Nashville, and family who will scatter her ashes in a creek that runs by a 200-year-old white oak on her parents’ land. Here she will sustain deer and coyote, dogwood and mountain azalea.   The loss of Tracey McCartney represents a significant blow to the National Fair Housing Community. Tracey McCartney joined the Tennessee Fair Housing Council in February 1998. She was an attorney, admitted to the bars of both Alabama and Tennessee. She received a law degree from the University of Alabama in 1995. While in law school, she worked for 2½ years as a clerk/advocate for the Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program, where she gained valuable fair housing experience...
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